Feathercoin daemon and wallet production version 0.17.0.2

[Guide] Homebrew powered risers.


  • Regular Member | Tip Nutnut

    It would seem that a few of you are frying your rigs due to too much power being pulled from the motherboard/24pin power connectors. I’ve done some digging to find out why some rigs are fine yet others fry. To save you the legwork here’s why i believe it to happen…

    [b]Rated Power[/b]
    An 8 pin PCI-e connector is rated to supply 150w
    A 6 pin PCI-e connector is rated to supply 75w
    The PCI-s slot is rated to supply 75w

    Note: I believe that the 6/8pin connectors are actually limited to their rated currents by the VRMs on the graphics board to stop them burning out so any surplus WILL pull from the motherboard. Unfortunately the motherboard will try to dish as much as the cards try to pull and cook itself!

    [b]Scenarios[/b]

    Scenario 1 - My rig with no powered risers. 4x 7970 with 1x6pin & 1x8pin. These can draw up to 270w when OC’d and running full tilt so they will get the first 225w from the PCIe 8/6pin connectors and the extra 45w per card from the motherboard. That 45w is in spec but multiply that by 4 cards and they’re pulling 180w through pins 10/11 on the 24pin ATX connector AND the tiny traces on the motherboard. Luckily i’m getting away with it but YMMV.

    Scenario 2 - Same thing but lower powered 7950s upto ~210w. Surely these should be fine if the 7970’s are?? Nope. SOME 7950’s only have 2x 6pin connectors which means they max out at 150w and the remaining 60w is pulled from the slot… Multiply by 4 and now we’re pulling 240w through the board/24pin. Pfzzzzt! Now i hear you scream “60w is still in spec for PCIe!”. Well, yes it is… Sort of. Just like every plug socket in the UK is rated at 13amp, see what happens if you load them ALL with 13 amps… Pfzzzzt!

    The issue is that the connector on the 24pin causes resistance, the bottleneck if you like, which heats it up and then melts it. Sometimes you’ll get away with it at the 24 pin and instead fry the trace on your motherboard. The solution is to use powered risers which inject the 12v current straight in to your riser and therefor bypassing the motherboard/24pin connector. This should stop the bottlenecks from burning out.

    [b]Powered Risers[/b]

    Now, there are 2 types of risers…

    Standard Shop bought Riser. These simply solder a molex connector to the power lines of the riser which you then connect a spare 4pin molex to and voila! You are no longer dragging all that current through the slot on the motherboard right? Wrong! The issue is that there is still a connection back to the motherboard so the other cards in the system can pull the power back through slot and through the motherboard traces again. It will help save the 24pin connector and will reduce the mobo load as at least one card will get it’s power directly from the PSU but now you’re pulling crazy currents through the ribbon cable of the riser too. Not an issue if you are using ALL powered risers but if you are only intending on 1 or 2 then it is an issue. The final thing is that the shop bought powered riser that i saw only had the power soldered to 1 pin so that connection to the card is dishing up all the juice and may be another bottleneck.

    My preferred design. These are the same as the shop bought ones except we use 5 pins for power and we [b]CUT[/b] the ribbon cable so there is no path back to the motherboard. This way only the card plugged directly in to the riser will receive power from the molex and you won’t start melting ribbon cables.

    OK, so i’ll stop rambling and explaining the why’s and show you the hows!

    [b]Making the power riser[/b]

    [color=red][b]Disclaimer:- I’m not an electrical engineer i’m just a guy that likes to read and tweak stuff. These risers work for me and should for you too BUT i accept no responsibility if you damage yourself or your rigs when making and/or using these risers! If you KNOW any of the info contained in this article to be inaccurate - please let me know and i’ll amend accordingly.[/b][/color]

    1. Identify the A and B sides of the riser…
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/801/jsu8.jpg/][IMG]http://img801.imageshack.us/img801/1355/jsu8.jpg[/img][/URL]
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/16/grkc.jpg/][IMG]http://img16.imageshack.us/img16/4407/grkc.jpg[/img][/URL]

    2. Split out and cut the power lines on side B. These are wires 1,2&3. I ran a scalpel along the grove for about an inch then just pulled them apart with my fingers. I know some of our more observant viewers will be shouting that pin3 on side B is reserved and not a 12v line but if you look at the graphics cards circuit board you’ll see them all bridged and we don’t want the current to loopback though pin 3.
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/542/kflx.jpg/][IMG]http://img542.imageshack.us/img542/9273/kflx.jpg[/img][/URL]

    3. Split out and cut the power lines on side A. These are wires 2&3. [color=red]Dont cut pin 1 on side A[/color]
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/834/qhce.jpg/][IMG]http://img834.imageshack.us/img834/9251/qhce.jpg[/img][/URL]

    4. You should end up with this… Note pin 1 still connected.
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/819/nzgi.jpg/][IMG]http://img819.imageshack.us/img819/1757/nzgi.jpg[/img][/URL]

    5. Strip them and twist them all together like so.
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/89/clpc.jpg/][IMG]http://img89.imageshack.us/img89/4633/clpc.jpg[/img][/URL]

    6. Onto the molex. I just grabbed a spare 30cm molex extension cable that uses 18awg cable…
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/62/ylac.jpg/][IMG]http://img62.imageshack.us/img62/6899/ylac.jpg[/img][/URL]

    7. Release the 2 black wires and the red wires from the socket. I found a pen that happened to have the right size head that slipped over the pins and released the tabs holding them in place. Then i just pulled the wires.
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/547/5xgo.jpg/][IMG]http://imageshack.us/scaled/large/547/5xgo.jpg[/img][/URL]
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/51/3o3c.jpg/][IMG]http://imageshack.us/scaled/large/51/3o3c.jpg[/img][/URL]

    8. Now cut of the other end of the cable and you should have this.
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/845/4q4o.jpg/][IMG]http://img845.imageshack.us/img845/9817/4q4o.jpg[/img][/URL]

    9. Strip the end of the yellow cable and then twist together with the 5 wires from the ribbon cable and solder it. You’ll notice i have slid some red heat shrink over the cable first - if you have some, use it. If not wrap in insulating tape.
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/18/enj1.jpg/][IMG]http://img18.imageshack.us/img18/7183/enj1.jpg[/img][/URL]

    10. Slide the heatshrink down and shrink it into place or wrap in tape and voila! A powered riser that won’t feed back in to the main board!
    [URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/541/8v3i.jpg/][IMG]http://img541.imageshack.us/img541/5017/8v3i.jpg[/img][/URL]

    I dedicate this guide to Svennand who’s fried yet another rig! :’(

    If this guide was helpful, feel free to donate the cost of the replacement motherboard i have saved you! :p


  • Regular Member | Tip ghostlander

    1. No need to cut the cable. Those wires are better to keep. Most of the current flows through the molex connector.

    2. Attached +12V but no earth. Bad. Additional capacitor or even two can be also useful.

    [quote]An 8 pin PCI-e connector is rated to supply 150w
    A 6 pin PCI-e connector is rated to supply 75w[/quote]

    That’s only in theory. In practice, the difference is only one earth pin. The other earth pin added is used for cable detect only. Actual limit is 6A per pair of +12V and earth pins, that’s 18A or 216W per connector. Pay attention to cable length and thickness though. AWG20 is no good unless very short (1 foot max.), AWG18 is all right at up to 2 feet, AWG16 performs well at any reasonable length.


  • Regular Member | Tip Nutnut

    [quote]
    1. No need to cut the cable. Those wires are better to keep. Most of the current flows through the molex connector.
    [/quote]

    I disagree. If i only power 1 card with the riser, the other 3 cards can pull the power back down the ribbon cable, through the pci-e slot, across the board and in to the other cards. This has the potential of burning the track on the mobo and/or melting the ribbon/yellow cable. As i said in the original post it’s OK if you are using powered risers on ALL cards.

    [quote]2. Attached +12V but no earth. Bad. Additional capacitor or even two can be also useful.[/quote]

    Please elaborate why a cap would help? Isn’t the power from the PSU clean enough? The system will simply use the existing ground on the slot. Capacitors seem to blow once the power steps up which will happen if the wires aren’t cut.

    [quote]That’s only in theory. In practice, the difference is only one earth pin. The other earth pin added is used for cable detect only. Actual limit is 6A per pair of +12V and earth pins, that’s 18A or 216W per connector. Pay attention to cable length and thickness though. AWG20 is no good unless very short (1 foot max.), AWG18 is all right at up to 2 feet, AWG16 performs well at any reasonable length.[/quote]

    Agreed but the SOCKET on the cards seems to be limited and won’t actually pull more than spec. Guessing it’s to protect the VRMs but I have no concrete evidence though others seem to report it and it does explain a few things.


  • Regular Member | Tip svennand

    Check, check, check and thanks for guide and also the dedication=P

    Your resonation regarding the things happening concur with what i have experienced.
    3 mb ruined, 1 at 24pin socket (completly burned out 2 of the holes), and 2 cards that got burned to crisp below the pci-e area at bottom of card.
    First one was with 6 cards mixed at once stock.
    second times where 4x7950 (which worked like a charm), until i tweaked the gnu/memclock, then all hell broke lose=)

    Will start building powered extenders very soon and use it on ALL my connection, i take no more chances! its not broken hw that bothers me, its downtime on those gpu investments!. ordered me an extra mb now so i have one to spare=P


  • | Tip sorrowfox

    Awesome! This better get Stickied.


  • Regular Member | Tip ghostlander

    [quote author=Nutnut]
    [quote author=ghostlander]
    1. No need to cut the cable. Those wires are better to keep. Most of the current flows through the molex connector.
    [/quote]

    I disagree. If i only power 1 card with the riser, the other 3 cards can pull the power back down the ribbon cable, through the pci-e slot, across the board and in to the other cards. This has the potential of burning the track on the mobo and/or melting the ribbon/yellow cable.[/quote]

    Ohm’s law disagrees with you. Path from power connectors on mainboard to other PCIe slots has much lower impedance.

    [quote author=Nutnut]
    [quote author=ghostlander]
    2. Attached +12V but no earth. Bad. Additional capacitor or even two can be also useful.[/quote]

    Please elaborate why a cap would help? Isn’t the power from the PSU clean enough? The system will simply use the existing ground on the slot. Capacitors seem to blow once the power steps up which will happen if the wires aren’t cut.[/quote]

    It isn’t clean enough. Bulk capacitors inside PSU are capable of basic low frequency filtering only. Additional capacitors at loads are required. PCIe ribbon extenders (these are not risers) add considerable amounts of impedance to power rails. That includes earth. Good quality capacitors don’t bulge.

    [quote author=Nutnut]
    [quote author=ghostlander]That’s only in theory. In practice, the difference is only one earth pin. The other earth pin added is used for cable detect only. Actual limit is 6A per pair of +12V and earth pins, that’s 18A or 216W per connector. Pay attention to cable length and thickness though. AWG20 is no good unless very short (1 foot max.), AWG18 is all right at up to 2 feet, AWG16 performs well at any reasonable length.[/quote]

    Agreed but the SOCKET on the cards seems to be limited and won’t actually pull more than spec. Guessing it’s to protect the VRMs but I have no concrete evidence though others seem to report it and it does explain a few things.
    [/quote]

    5A per pin pair is regular socket’s capability. Good quality gold plated ones can do in excess of 6A. 6/8-pin design isn’t to protect VRMs, it’s to prevent users from connecting old 6-pin only PSUs to modern power hungry cards while maintaining backward compatibility. Can be worked around with ease though.


  • Regular Member | Tip svennand

    Hmm what about pci-e 1x to 16x extenders?


  • Regular Member | Tip Nutnut

    [quote name=“svennand” post=“17392” timestamp=“1372088576”]
    Hmm what about pci-e 1x to 16x extenders?
    [/quote]

    Exactly the same.

    [quote author=ghostlander link=topic=2193.msg17391#msg17391 date=1372088537]
    [quote author=Nutnut]
    [quote author=ghostlander]
    1. No need to cut the cable. Those wires are better to keep. Most of the current flows through the molex connector.
    [/quote]

    I disagree. If i only power 1 card with the riser, the other 3 cards can pull the power back down the ribbon cable, through the pci-e slot, across the board and in to the other cards. This has the potential of burning the track on the mobo and/or melting the ribbon/yellow cable.[/quote]

    Ohm’s law disagrees with you. Path from power connectors on mainboard to other PCIe slots has much lower impedance.

    [quote author=Nutnut]
    [quote author=ghostlander]
    2. Attached +12V but no earth. Bad. Additional capacitor or even two can be also useful.[/quote]

    Please elaborate why a cap would help? Isn’t the power from the PSU clean enough? The system will simply use the existing ground on the slot. Capacitors seem to blow once the power steps up which will happen if the wires aren’t cut.[/quote]

    It isn’t clean enough. Bulk capacitors inside PSU are capable of basic low frequency filtering only. Additional capacitors at loads are required. PCIe ribbon extenders (these are not risers) add considerable amounts of impedance to power rails. That includes earth. Good quality capacitors don’t bulge.

    [quote author=Nutnut]
    [quote author=ghostlander]That’s only in theory. In practice, the difference is only one earth pin. The other earth pin added is used for cable detect only. Actual limit is 6A per pair of +12V and earth pins, that’s 18A or 216W per connector. Pay attention to cable length and thickness though. AWG20 is no good unless very short (1 foot max.), AWG18 is all right at up to 2 feet, AWG16 performs well at any reasonable length.[/quote]

    Agreed but the SOCKET on the cards seems to be limited and won’t actually pull more than spec. Guessing it’s to protect the VRMs but I have no concrete evidence though others seem to report it and it does explain a few things.
    [/quote]

    5A per pin pair is regular socket’s capability. Good quality gold plated ones can do in excess of 6A. 6/8-pin design isn’t to protect VRMs, it’s to prevent users from connecting old 6-pin only PSUs to modern power hungry cards while maintaining backward compatibility. Can be worked around with ease though.

    [/quote]

    So I didn’t think there was any additional filtering between the 24pin +12v and the pcie slots. Is there any filtering between the 24pin socket and the pcie slots? If yes then the impedance would higher via the 24pin therefor current would flow back down the ribbon cable. If there’s no filtering then there’s no difference filtering wise between the powered riser/extender and the 24pin therefor a cap is not needed. Also, the graphics cards themselves will have the filters in their own power circuits. Then there’s the issue of multiple psu’s, if you are running multiple power supplies you don’t want to be mixing the +12v so you MUST cut the 12v.

    The “power filters” (capacitors) that have started to appear IMHO are nothing more than a marketing gimmick designed to double the price. I never even saw one on an extender until people started complaining that they were exploding! Nearly ALL powered extenders out there are +12v only. No ground and no cap. Granted they don’t sever the wires but then they say that you MUST plug the riser in to the primary psu because they don’t cut the power lines.

    Again i’m not an electrical engineer and people can add caps in-line if they wish. They can also leave the the ribbon un-severed if they wish (prided they are single PSU. This is how i built mine and they’re working lovely. 😃


  • Regular Member | Tip ghostlander

    [quote]So I didn’t think there was any additional filtering between the 24pin +12v and the pcie slots. Is there any filtering between the 24pin socket and the pcie slots? If yes then the impedance would higher via the 24pin therefor current would flow back down the ribbon cable.[/quote]

    How come additional filtering implies higher DC impedance? Resistance actually, Z = R + jX, and the latter is zero for DC. It’s defined basically by physical characteristics of PCB copper layers and connector quality. There are additional bulk capacitors on mainboards near loads to reduce transient voltage drops and improve high frequency response. VRMs operate at clock speeds up to 1MHz and above while switching PSUs work at 25kHz to 100kHz usually. We’re talking about basics now. Advanced noise filtering is much more complicated.


  • Regular Member | Tip Nutnut

    [quote name=“ghostlander” post=“17406” timestamp=“1372093311”]
    [quote]So I didn’t think there was any additional filtering between the 24pin +12v and the pcie slots. Is there any filtering between the 24pin socket and the pcie slots? If yes then the impedance would higher via the 24pin therefor current would flow back down the ribbon cable.[/quote]

    How come additional filtering implies higher DC impedance? Resistance actually, Z = R + jX, and the latter is zero for DC. It’s defined basically by physical characteristics of PCB copper layers and connector quality. There are additional bulk capacitors on mainboards near loads to reduce transient voltage drops and improve high frequency response. VRMs operate at clock speeds up to 1MHz and above while switching PSUs work at 25kHz to 100kHz usually. We’re talking about basics now. Advanced noise filtering is much more complicated.
    [/quote]

    So, being a man of action, i went to the shed armed with a meter, stuck it inline with the riser (no connection back to the motherboard) and here’s the results

    1 card is pulling 3.1amp @ 12v through the pcie riser

    Now i stuck the meter in line on the riser (creating the connection back to the motherboard). The rig was now running 3 cards and it was pulling 3 amp through the riser and 3.1 amp through each of the 24pin 12v lines for 9a total.

    Result? The current draw was pretty much exactly divided between the riser and the 2x12v connectors on the 24pin so there IS power being pulled back down through the riser. I’ll keep the lines cut.

    As for “power filters”… Nothing like algebra to send me to sleep but regardless, I’m SURE that the power filtering on the graphics cards will out perform and negate the need for a capacitor slapped on the riser.


  • Regular Member | Tip svennand

    hehe can you guys agree soon? 😉

    Waiting patiently for final solution=P
    Since im ALL out of luck my mainrig also went down.
    This time it probably was my own fault, had issues with computer died after about an hour mining.
    Since everything allready was fubar i desided to do some spring cleaning in the computer, then all of a sudden i saw a 6pin connector on the motherboard (Asus Extreme V), nicely hidden close to the CPU, after
    confronting the manual about this highly exiting find i found out that the connector was for supplying the pci-e sockets with extra juice for multicard setup (thaaaats me!).
    When rearranging the 7970 cards (have two of them in that computer) i saw something not that fun (another cable has meltet! 6+2pins from my seasonic x1250!)
    [img]http://s22.postimg.org/6uxwxvqep/bilde_3.jpg[/img]

    Replaced this cable and hopefully it will soon be fixed again.
    Within one week i have fried on 24pin connector, 2 motherboards burned to crisp, and now a 6+2pins connector… Ill go all in for the powered extenders! i swear :o

    No wonder that computer didnt like it when i pushed 4x 7970 in it and cranked it up=P (Gigabyte 7970 Ghz edition 1100/1500 stock).


  • Regular Member | Tip Nutnut

    What on earth are you doing man?? How have you burnt an 8pin? There must be sommat up coz that ain’t right! :o

    In a panic (i never thought to check them) i just looked at all of my connectors and they’re cool to the touch. I’m using seasoninc x1250 with 4x gv-797oc-gd3 (not the OC edition but still cranked to 1080/1500) and they’re fine. As are the other 2 rigs with the AX1200i. ???

    Speechless.


  • Regular Member | Tip svennand

    [quote name=“Nutnut” post=“17429” timestamp=“1372104613”]
    What on earth are you doing man?? How have you burnt an 8pin? There must be sommat up coz that ain’t right! :o

    In a panic (i never thought to check them) i just looked at all of my connectors and they’re cool to the touch. I’m using seasoninc x1250 with 4x gv-797oc-gd3 (not the OC edition but still cranked to 1080/1500) and they’re fine. As are the other 2 rigs with the AX1200i. ???

    Speechless.
    [/quote]

    I have no idea how it has happend:P seems pretty far out. But nothing surprices me anymore :-\


  • Regular Member | Tip ghostlander

    [quote name=“Nutnut” post=“17409” timestamp=“1372095671”]
    So, being a man of action, i went to the shed armed with a meter, stuck it inline with the riser (no connection back to the motherboard) and here’s the results

    1 card is pulling 3.1amp @ 12v through the pcie riser

    Now i stuck the meter in line on the riser (creating the connection back to the motherboard). The rig was now running 3 cards and it was pulling 3 amp through the riser and 3.1 amp through each of the 24pin 12v lines for 9a total.

    Result? The current draw was pretty much exactly divided between the riser and the 2x12v connectors on the 24pin so there IS power being pulled back down through the riser. I’ll keep the lines cut.
    [/quote]

    3A per card is very much within the PCIe specification. That’s all right if you have one or two cards installed as two +12V pins of 24-pin EATX connector can forward enough current plus feed some ICs on mainboard. Although many Crossfire/SLI enabled mainboards come with additional Molex 8981 style connector to make sure you never exceed allowable current. Both ASUS A8N-SLI Premium and ABIT AT8 32X in my oldest rigs have one. If you set up three cards and have no Molex, it could be a problem. If there are four cards or more, expect a big problem to come.

    Now the situation. You have four cards in a rig, each at 3A through a PCIe connector. One receives power through a powered riser, the other three consume 9A total through the 24-pin EATX connector on mainboard. That’s not good. Need to off-load some current by powering another riser or by connecting the existing one to the mainboard, so up to 2A may come through. I think the latter is better.


  • | Tip lbr

    [quote author=ghostlander link=action=profile;u=448 date=1386650016]
    [quote author=lbr link=action=profile;u=24747 date=1386624022]
    Hello,

    For some reason I can’t post in the thread(prly cause I’m just registered).

    [url=http://forum.feathercoin.com/index.php/topic,2193.msg17391.html#msg17391]http://forum.feathercoin.com/index.php/topic,2193.msg17391.html#msg17391[/url]

    [quote]Ohm’s law disagrees with you. Path from power connectors on mainboard to other PCIe slots has much lower impedance.
    [/quote]
    Plz define “much lower”?
    I mean… ok, voltage drop will occur, so what if it’s not too high? Right?
    And for multiple PSU usage… cutting is absolutely must, right?

    [quote]It isn’t clean enough. Bulk capacitors inside PSU are capable of basic low frequency filtering only. Additional capacitors at loads are required. PCIe ribbon extenders (these are not risers) add considerable amounts of impedance to power rails. That includes earth. Good quality capacitors don’t bulge.
    [/quote]

    F.e. CoolerMaster-SIlentProM 1000W PSU, second line caps are 16v 1600uf, low esr ones.
    Imo they are good enough for not only low frequency filtering…
    or… there should be some low capacitance film caps as well?

    If caps should be added on riser, which ones?
    I assume some solid 16v?

    Also, why exactly caps at loads are required?

    Thanks
    [/quote]

    Make one post in the forum for newbies first. Much lowe is significantly lower. It depends, but the difference may be high. Multiple PSUs are fine as long as you synchronise them properly. 1600uF/16V are not good for HF as they’re liquid electrolytes. Solid or polymer tantalum are good. Watch the polarity as tantalums explode if reversed.

    [/quote]

    Thanks for your reply.
    Sorry for asking so much questions, but you are the first person I’ve seen on digital currencies forums who actually has some technical understanding of electricity ; )

    Ok, how do I measure impedance?
    I can use digital testers, analog oscilloscope.
    Impedance is resistance under voltage applied, right?
    What do you mean by “synchronise them properly” on/off sync?

    I always cut my risers in fear that +12v PSUs lines will “meet”… and nothing good happens ; )
    Was my assumption right?

    Hm, what if I took two oscilloscope readings - from PSU +12v line and from motherboard +12v line, would it help to determine which caps exactly are needed to be soldered on the riser?


  • | Tip lbr

    [quote name=“ghostlander” post=“17356” timestamp=“1372081622”]
    2. Attached +12V but no earth. Bad. Additional capacitor or even two can be also useful.
    [/quote]

    so… riser should also have thick-enough earth wire connected to PSU earth?


  • Regular Member | Tip ghostlander

    It’s a bit complicated to measure very low impedance with consumer grade digital multimeters. We’re talking about DC, so R=U/I. The PSUs are synchronised if they can be powered up by a single button and don’t interfere with each other. It’s not good to have rails crossed of the same PSU. It’s even worse to have them crossed of different PSUs. A good scope is what you need to check for power supply quality. It’s a matter of thumb to place capacitors as close as possible to the point of load. Small HF capable capacitors come first, bulk electrolytes come last.

    [quote name=“lbr” post=“42649” timestamp=“1386704212”]
    [quote author=ghostlander link=topic=2193.msg17356#msg17356 date=1372081622]
    2. Attached +12V but no earth. Bad. Additional capacitor or even two can be also useful.
    [/quote]

    so… riser should also have thick-enough earth wire connected to PSU earth?
    [/quote]

    Yes. All power wires should be as thick as you can afford. We are not into a mass production, so the extra cost is negligible.


  • | Tip mirrax

    [s]So for 1x-1x riser scenario is absolutely the same, right?

    Mission accomplished?
    [url=http://www.ebay.com/itm/25CM-PCI-E-1x-To-16x-Riser-Card-Ribbon-Extender-Extension-Cable-With-Molex-Power-/201002973530?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2eccb5f95a]http://www.ebay.com/itm/25CM-PCI-E-1x-To-16x-Riser-Card-Ribbon-Extender-Extension-Cable-With-Molex-Power-/201002973530?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2eccb5f95a[/url]

    And the one with capacitor? Now after some time do you think the caps are needed?
    [url=http://www.ebay.com/itm/4PIN-Molex-Power-Filter-PCI-E-Extension-Cable-1x-16x-Extender-Riser-Card-Adapter-/181151058265?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a2d71c959]http://www.ebay.com/itm/4PIN-Molex-Power-Filter-PCI-E-Extension-Cable-1x-16x-Extender-Riser-Card-Adapter-/181151058265?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a2d71c959[/url][/s]

    Screw this… I go for 16x-16x riser (4USD) and will fully follow Nut’s instructions.


  • | Tip Max.Wyght

    [s]nutnut, will you update your guide with how to add eathing to the risers?[/s]

    edit:
    So after my serious brain fart and meltdown, I figured out the right sentence structure;
    Nutnut, will you be updating your guide with how to add grounding to the home-made risers?


  • Regular Member | Tip sheepson

    I’ve order some ‘normal’ risers so i am going to read this topic carefully soon!

    Added the guide to:
    [url=http://forum.feathercoin.com/index.php/topic,685]http://forum.feathercoin.com/index.php/topic,685[/url]